• Framing Lumber:  Lumber mills generally categorize framing lumber as studs, two-by-fours, two-by-sixes, four-by-fours, among other terms.  The grading system for lumber indicates whether it is appropriate for framing.  Softwood is the prevalent framing species, with grading systems based on structural requirements.  The grade stamp will include the species, quality or number of defects, moisture content and origination. The most common species’ used for framing lumber are Douglas Fir, Spruce, Southern Pine and Hemlock.  Because the lumber is often combined generically, the grade stamps may group two or more types together, such as “Hem-Fir” or “Spruce-Pine-Fir”.
  • CDX:  CDX Plywood is generally used under shingles and roofing felt, on walls (just behind siding and insulation), and as a sub floor (just under the carpet pad or tiled floor’s durock).  CDX plywood works great for projects where function is more important than appearance. The letter “X” in CDX refers to the type of glue used in the factory to bond the plywood veneers.  The letter “X” stands for exposure, which means the plywood is tough enough to withstand a little moisture, but only for a limited time.  The letters “C” and “D” represent the quality of the surfaces (front/back).  If “A” is the best level of plywood veneer you can buy, then the letters “C” and “D” indicate a lower grade of quality and the price will reflect this.
  • OSB:  Oriented Strandboard (OSB) has more going for it than just a lower cost.  OSB can be made from small, fast growing trees and can be purchased in 9 foot sheets which allow you to sheathe a wall from the top plate to the bottom of the floor joists with single, vertical sheets leaving no horizontal seams.  OSB also boasts a more consistent density.  While a sheet of standard plywood might be 5 to 7 plies thick, a sheet of OSB is made from as many as 50 strand layers packed and compressed into the same thickness.  On the downside, OSB is much heavier than plywood.
  • Hardware:  Framing hardware connectors, such as joist hangers, concrete anchors, straps & ties, etc. are all used to hold structural framing together in wood-to-wood and wood-to-concrete joints.  Connectors are used for high wind resistance, earthquake resistance, engineered lumber, plated trusses, and many more uses.   Additionally, framing hardware has been expanded to include Architectural Products that not only provide the structural strength required, but they also look great on exposed beam connections.  A few examples of framing hardware options can be found below.
  • SFPI Engineered Wood:  Snavely Forest Products has developed Engineered Wood Products, such as SFP I-Joists, SFP LVLs, SFP Rim Board and SFP-Lam 2.0.  These products have been machined and/or laminated to provide more strength with less material than traditional lumber.  Floor and roof systems built with SFP I-Joists use about half the number of trees as those build with standard dimensional lumber.