Specialty Wood Products supplies a wide variety of quality wood paneling and interior trim to building contractors throughout Colorado and the Denver metro area.

Paneling:  Paneling is a millwork wall covering traditionally constructed of interlocking wood.  Paneling was developed in ancient times to make rooms in stone buildings more comfortable.  The panels served to insulate the room from the cold stone.  In more modern times, such paneling is often installed for decorative purposes.

  • Clear:   This grade of lumber is popular when a fine appearance is important.  This grade includes the highest quality products produced from the clear portion of the log.  Pieces may exhibit a few minor characteristics which do not detract from the high appearance and quality of the lumber.
    • Alder:  Alder has a fine balance of desirable properties for furniture, casework, railings, cabinets, doors, window frames and many other applications.  It is a naturally light colored wood that can be finished in both dark and light styles.  Alder can be easily matched to Cherry, Walnut, Pecan, Maple, Mahogany, Aspen and Birch finishes.  Both the heart wood and sap wood are the same light golden color, and accept stains, dyes and finishes with the same consistency.
    • Doug Fir:  The texture of this softwood is smooth with a straight, even grain and knots that create beautiful swirl patterns. This wood is a light, rosy color that is set off by its remarkably straight and handsome grain pattern. Will tend to “redden” over time when exposed to light. Paints easily and can hold all types of stains and finishes. A popular choice for front doors, as it naturally resists weathering.
    • Hemlock:  This wood features a fine-textured, straight-grained appearance. It is light and bright in color, varying from a creamy, nearly white to a light, straw-red color. Sometimes hemlock may have a slight lavender cast, especially around the knots and in the transition area between the spring and summerwood growth rings. This wood often contains small mineral deposits, but is free of pitch and is not likely to splinter. While wood darkens over time with exposure to sunlight, hemlock often remains true to its original, freshly milled pastel color.
    • Pine:  Pine contains distinct color variations and the grain can appear straight or erratic depending on how it is cut from the log. The wood will darken and yellow with age, adding character and charm. It machines to a fine, smooth finish and easily accepts lighter stains and paint. Staining is recommended to achieve a uniform appearance because pine naturally contains resins that can affect penetration. Knots should be sealed before painting.
    • Cedar:  Cedar is a highly revered durable wood which is naturally resistant to rot, decay and insect damage.  All of this means that anything you build with cedar will last longer and require less maintenance.  The beauty of cedar does not stop with its durability.  It is an extremely aesthetic product, which will certainly make any project you build with it a beautiful finished product as well.  Cedar is a product which is ideal for accepting, and holding, a wide range of finishes.
  • Knotty: This grade of lumber is popular when a rustic look with a lot of character is desired.  The knots in this grade stand out and dominate the surface.  Physically, knotty wood functions comparably to clearer grades, but has a lower cost.
    • Alder:  Alder has a fine balance of desirable properties for furniture, casework, railings, cabinets, doors, window frames and many other applications.  It is a naturally light colored wood that can be finished in both dark and light styles.  Alder can be easily matched to Cherry, Walnut, Pecan, Maple, Mahogany, Aspen and Birch finishes.  Both the heart wood and sap wood are the same light golden color, and accept stains, dyes and finishes with the same consistency.
    • Doug Fir:  The texture of this softwood is smooth with a straight, even grain and knots that create beautiful swirl patterns. This wood is a light, rosy color that is set off by its remarkably straight and handsome grain pattern. Will tend to “redden” over time when exposed to light. Paints easily and can hold all types of stains and finishes. A popular choice for front doors, as it naturally resists weathering.
    • Pine:  Pine contains distinct color variations and the grain can appear straight or erratic depending on how it is cut from the log. The wood will darken and yellow with age, adding character and charm. It machines to a fine, smooth finish and easily accepts lighter stains and paint. Staining is recommended to achieve a uniform appearance because pine naturally contains resins that can affect penetration. Knots should be sealed before painting.
    • Cedar:  Cedar is a highly revered durable wood which is naturally resistant to rot, decay and insect damage.  All of this means that anything you build with cedar will last longer and require less maintenance.  The beauty of cedar does not stop with its durability.  It is an extremely aesthetic product, which will certainly make any project you build with it a beautiful finished product as well.  Cedar is a product which is ideal for accepting, and holding, a wide range of finishes.
    • Reclaimed:   Reclaimed lumber is a mix of species harvested from barns and other rural structures.  The wood comes in varying shades of gray and brown and has a “worn, but warm” patina as a result of exposure to years of weather and sun.

Trim:  Trim (external & internal) can be found on every home.  Trim serves to seal out the wind and weather and to give the structure or home a finished look.  Trim wood needs to be both stable and attractive for it to provide the most benefits for your home.

  • Clear:  This grade of lumber is popular when a fine appearance is important.  This grade includes the highest quality products produced from the clear portion of the log.  Pieces may exhibit a few minor characteristics which do not detract from the high appearance and quality of the lumber.
    • Alder:  Alder has a fine balance of desirable properties for furniture, casework, railings, cabinets, doors, window frames and many other applications.  It is a naturally light colored wood that can be finished in both dark and light styles.  Alder can be easily matched to Cherry, Walnut, Pecan, Maple, Mahogany, Aspen and Birch finishes.  Both the heart wood and sap wood are the same light golden color, and accept stains, dyes and finishes with the same consistency.
    • Doug Fir:  The texture of this softwood is smooth with a straight, even grain and knots that create beautiful swirl patterns. This wood is a light, rosy color that is set off by its remarkably straight and handsome grain pattern. Will tend to “redden” over time when exposed to light. Paints easily and can hold all types of stains and finishes. A popular choice for front doors, as it naturally resists weathering.
    • Hemlock:  This wood features a fine-textured, straight-grained appearance. It is light and bright in color, varying from a creamy, nearly white to a light, straw-red color. Sometimes hemlock may have a slight lavender cast, especially around the knots and in the transition area between the spring and summerwood growth rings. This wood often contains small mineral deposits, but is free of pitch and is not likely to splinter. While wood darkens over time with exposure to sunlight, hemlock often remains true to its original, freshly milled pastel color.
    • Pine:  Pine contains distinct color variations and the grain can appear straight or erratic depending on how it is cut from the log. The wood will darken and yellow with age, adding character and charm. It machines to a fine, smooth finish and easily accepts lighter stains and paint. Staining is recommended to achieve a uniform appearance because pine naturally contains resins that can affect penetration. Knots should be sealed before painting.
    • Cedar:  Cedar is a highly revered durable wood which is naturally resistant to rot, decay and insect damage.  All of this means that anything you build with cedar will last longer and require less maintenance.  The beauty of cedar does not stop with its durability.  It is an extremely aesthetic product, which will certainly make any project you build with it a beautiful finished product as well.  Cedar is a product which is ideal for accepting, and holding, a wide range of finishes.
  • Knotty: This grade of lumber is popular when a rustic look with a lot of character is desired.  The knots in this grade stand out and dominate the surface.  Physically, knotty wood functions comparably to clearer grades, but has a lower cost.
    • Alder:  Alder has a fine balance of desirable properties for furniture, casework, railings, cabinets, doors, window frames and many other applications.  It is a naturally light colored wood that can be finished in both dark and light styles.  Alder can be easily matched to Cherry, Walnut, Pecan, Maple, Mahogany, Aspen and Birch finishes.  Both the heart wood and sap wood are the same light golden color, and accept stains, dyes and finishes with the same consistency.
    • Doug Fir:  The texture of this softwood is smooth with a straight, even grain and knots that create beautiful swirl patterns. This wood is a light, rosy color that is set off by its remarkably straight and handsome grain pattern. Will tend to “redden” over time when exposed to light. Paints easily and can hold all types of stains and finishes. A popular choice for front doors, as it naturally resists weathering.
    • Pine:  Pine contains distinct color variations and the grain can appear straight or erratic depending on how it is cut from the log. The wood will darken and yellow with age, adding character and charm. It machines to a fine, smooth finish and easily accepts lighter stains and paint. Staining is recommended to achieve a uniform appearance because pine naturally contains resins that can affect penetration. Knots should be sealed before painting.
    • Cedar:  Cedar is a highly revered durable wood which is naturally resistant to rot, decay and insect damage.  All of this means that anything you build with cedar will last longer and require less maintenance.  The beauty of cedar does not stop with its durability.  It is an extremely aesthetic product, which will certainly make any project you build with it a beautiful finished product as well.  Cedar is a product which is ideal for accepting, and holding, a wide range of finishes.
    • Reclaimed:   Reclaimed lumber is a mix of species harvested from barns and other rural structures.  The wood comes in varying shades of gray and brown and has a “worn, but warm” patina as a result of exposure to years of weather and sun.

 

Call the Specialty Wood Products team of building materials experts for more information!
Phone: 303-288-8484

FRAMING/EWP ( Engineered Wood Products)

  • Framing Lumber, CDX, OSB
  • Hardware
  • Snavely Forest SFPI

PANELING

  • Clear
    • Alder
    • Doug Fir
    • Hemlock
    • Miscellaneous
  • Knotty
    • Alder
    • Doug Fir
    • Hemlock
    • Miscellaneous

TRIM

  • Clear
    • Alder
    • Doug Fir

 Siding/Paneling Coverage Chart

Wood paneling is sold by the linear (or lineal) foot. Your quantity requirements are calculated by multiplying your square foot area by a linear factor based on the siding width. The Lineal Foot Factor is derived by dividing 12 inches by the individual pattern’s exposed face.

a) Calculate the square footage in walls: length x height = sq. ft.

b) Calculate, and then subtract, the square footage of openings

c) Add 10% to cover trim and waste

d) Multiply the result by the factor for lineal feet

T&G Siding Coverage

Nominal Width Dressed Width Exposed Face Linear Ft Factor*
6″ 5 7/16″ 5 1/16″

2.37

8″ 7 1/8″ 6 3/4″

1.78

10″ 9 1/8″ 8 3/4″

1.37

* assuming 3/8″ board overlap

Shiplap Siding Coverage

Nominal Width Dressed Width Exposed Face Linear Ft Factor*
6″ 5 1/2″ 5″

2.4

8″ 7 1/4″ 6 3/4″

1.78

10″ 9 1/4″ 8 3/4″

1.37

* assuming 1/2″ overlap

Bevel Thin Butt Coverage

Nominal Width Dressed Width Exposed Face Linear Ft Factor*
4″ 3 1/2″ 2 1/2″

4.8

5″ 4 1/2″ 3 1/2″

3.43

6″ 5 1/2″ 4 1/2″

2.67

* assuming 1″ overlap

Bevel Thick Butt Coverage

Nominal Width Dressed Width Exposed Face Linear Ft Factor*
6″ 5 1/2″ 4 1/2″

2.67

8″ 7 1/4″ 6 1/4″

1.92

10″ 9 1/4″ 8 1/4″

1.45

* assuming 1″ overlap

Channel Rustic Coverage

Nominal Width Dressed Width Exposed Face Linear Ft Factor*
6″ 5 3/8″ 4 7/8″

2.47

8″ 7 1/8″ 6 5/8″

1.81

10″ 9 1/8″ 8 5/8″

1.39

* assuming 1/2″ overlap

QTR Log Siding Coverage

Nominal Width Dressed Width Exposed Face Linear FT Factor*
6″ 5-7/16″ 4 15/16″

2.43

8″ 7-1/8″ 6 5/8″

1.81

10″ 9-1/8″ 8 5/8″

1.39

* assuming 1/2″ overlap

Coverage Example: If you are siding four walls 8 feet high by 40 feet long with 8″ wide siding and we allow 10% of the total square feet for openings, you would need approximately 2250-2450 linear feet depending on pattern selected:
* Lineal Foot Factor is derived by dividing 12” by the exposed face